Is tren an illegal steroid

It’s no secret there exist a strong anti-steroidal population and as this “anti” feeling is often so emotionally based it can produce some laughable claims. If you’ve been around the performance enhancing game for any length of time you’re familiar with all the names and acronyms so this will probably make you laugh. Yes, there are a few street names for steroids such as juice or roids but those are some very generic terms and really don’t point to anything specific. We went to a handful of the anti-steroid websites so desperate to paint anabolic hormones in a bad light and they have made up their own street names for steroids that are quite humorous and they include “Pumpers, Gym Candy, Arnolds, Stackers, Balls and Bulls, A’s, Weight Trainers.” “Weight Trainers” are you serious, Arnolds? If that didn’t make you laugh a little then you don’t have a sense of humor but the sad truth is these websites are real and many of them are funded by your government.

Please understand Tren cycles of this nature are very dangerous, they are hard on your heart and blood pressure and if you desire to remain safe they are not something you will ever want to mess with; we have simply made you aware of what some do but this does not mean you should do it to. The reality is very simple, there is hardly a man out there no matter how far advanced that needs more than 100mg of Trenbolone every other day; we can however make an exception of making this dose daily the last 10-14 days before a bodybuilding competition for a hardening affect but thats it.

Structure/function claims have historically appeared on the labels of conventional foods and dietary supplements as well as drugs. The Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 (DSHEA) established some special regulatory requirements and procedures for using structure/function claims and two related types of dietary supplement labeling claims, claims of general well-being and claims related to a nutrient deficiency disease. Structure/function claims may describe the role of a nutrient or dietary ingredient intended to affect the normal structure or function of the human body, for example, "calcium builds strong bones." In addition, they may characterize the means by which a nutrient or dietary ingredient acts to maintain such structure or function, for example, "fiber maintains bowel regularity," or "antioxidants maintain cell integrity." General well-being claims describe general well-being from consumption of a nutrient or dietary ingredient. Nutrient deficiency disease claims describe a benefit related to a nutrient deficiency disease (like vitamin C and scurvy), but such claims are allowed only if they also say how widespread the disease is in the United States. These three types of claims are not pre-approved by FDA, but the manufacturer must have substantiation that the claim is truthful and not misleading and must submit a notification with the text of the claim to FDA no later than 30 days after marketing the dietary supplement with the claim. If a dietary supplement label includes such a claim, it must state in a "disclaimer" that FDA has not evaluated the claim. The disclaimer must also state that the dietary supplement product is not intended to "diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease," because only a drug can legally make such a claim. Structure/function claims may not explicitly or implicitly link the claimed effect of the nutrient or dietary ingredient to a disease or state of health leading to a disease. Further information regarding structure/function claims can be found in FDA's January 9, 2002 Structure/Function Claims Small Entity Compliance Guide .

Is tren an illegal steroid

is tren an illegal steroid

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